Home Lead Story No.13 property prices continue to suffer from homebuyers superstitions

No.13 property prices continue to suffer from homebuyers superstitions

by LLP Editor
28th Oct 21 10:07 am

Research by central London estate agency, Bective, has revealed that superstitions surrounding the number 13 are alive and well across the property market, with every region of England and Wales seeing the average sold price for No.13 homes slump below the rest of the market – except one.

Bective analysed sold prices records from the Land Registry and found that over the last year, properties selling with the No.13 have seen an average sold price of £208,000. This is £15,750 less than the average sold price of £223,750 across the rest of the market.

The West Midlands is home to the most superstitious buyers, with No.13 homes selling for £23,000 less, while Yorkshire and the Humber (-£21,500), and Wales (-£19,000) are also home to some of the biggest reductions for the price paid for a No.13 property versus the rest of the market.

In fact, the negative trend for No.13 sold prices is apparent across every region of England and Wales apart from one – London.

In London, the average price paid for a No.13 property comes in at £500,000, £1 more than the average sold price seen across the rest of the market.

However, when it comes to London’s high-end market, the No.13 seems to be more of a blessing than a curse for prime London homeowners.

Bective’s analysis shows that across London’s prime postcodes over the last 12 months, No.13 properties have sold for an average of £1,775,903.

Prime London homes across the rest of the market have sold for an average of £1,147,835 during the same time, meaning prime London homebuyers have paid £628,000 more on average for a No.13 property.

Bective’s Head of Sales, Craig Tonkin, commented: “Even in the modern age, it seems as though superstitions continue to play a part in society and this is particularly apparent when it comes to the number 13 and the price we’re willing to pay for a property that has been tarnished with this unlucky number.

However, as often is the case, the London market goes against the grain in this respect and homebuyers across the capital remain unphased about the potential ill will that could arise from a number 13 property purchase.

In fact, the number 13 even carries a property price premium in London’s prime market, with the capital’s best-heeled buyers paying hundreds of thousands more despite the wider superstitions associated with the number.”

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